Princeton Airport Newsletter – July 2013

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New from 39N

July, 2013
Lights:  123.05: 
  AWOS (609-924-3901                                             609-921-3100

Scheduling

In This Issue
Meet ‘n Greet
New Chief Pilot
Safety Corner
Slow Flight
Safety Seminar
Summer Tours
FAA Doctor
Princeton Airport Flying Tigers

JULY, 2013 

4th:  Independence Day
VFR – Open all day
IFR – Close at 1:00 pm
9th:  Ramadan begins at
sundown.
10th:  Safety Seminar
Systems/Instruments

 

Tuesday – July & August
Free airport tours
10:30 am.

CONGRATULATIONS 

1st SOLO:

Nicholas Pengue – Robert Argila

Desmond A. Brown – Rob
Argila

Szymon Rusinkiewicz – Robert Argila

Andrew Gilpin – Steve Hansell
Jeffrey Karper – Rob ArgilaMadhusoodan Parthasarathy –
Deandre Robinson 

PRIVATE PILOT:

Brian Ranes – John Bastan

 

INSTRUMENT PILOT:

Barry Speronello – Stephen
Hansell

CHECK OUR HONOR ROLL

AIRPLANE OF THE MONTH 

  2000 Cessna 172R    2000 Cessna 172R
1300 TT
King IFR
Auto Pilot
Excellent time builder.
Call Ken: 609-731-4728 
 

  FOR THIS & OTHER AIRPLANES AVAILABLE

  

Ken@princetonairport.com   

             609-731-4628 

Join Our Mailing List

Dear Robert,

Things at the airport have been lively – some new faces, and many long time users. We welcome everyone to enjoy the long days on sunlight.  Stay cool, take off and keep climbing.

MEET ‘N GREET WILL RETURN IN
SEPTEMBER.

AVIONICS NEWS 
Transponders:  Is your transponder within currency?  If not, call for a check.
ADSB:  You have time to install this, however since it provides free traffic and current weather, you might want to install it now.  If you have any questions, please contact Ken.

From the RIght Seat
by Assistant Chief Pilot Peter Rafle

You have all heard instructors say that you need “to be ahead” of the airplane.  Just what does that mean?  How do I get my brain to stay ahead of where the airplane actually is?

It all has to do with the brain.  After all, it doesn’t take a lot of muscle to control the airplane.  Aviating is about 98% mental and 2% physical.

A few examples might help to see where I am headed.  Radio frequencies while enroute need to be changed as each flight following agency hands you off to the next sector.  In your preflight planning, you can note the approach control frequencies that you will encounter and can anticipate when a particular frequency will come up next.  Setting it into the standby frequency will keep you ahead of the airplane and ready for the next change.

CONTINUE READING 

Renovated Machine Shop
Machine Shop

If you have ever had a chance to go into the machine shop, you would wonder how anyone found anything.  However, Jeff Vamos has been working for several months to make it first class.  It now resembles a operating room.
Great job!

Traffic Pattern Entry
by Chief Pilot Robert Argila

 

When I was a student, I learned the golden rule of standard traffic pattern entries: Always enter the downwind leg on a 45-degree angle and at pattern altitude. This is the best and safest entry, because it enables you to see other pilots in the pattern and enables those in the pattern to see you. It also allows you to establish yourself about a half-mile from the runway on a downwind ground track, which puts you in a familiar position from which to complete the pattern and your landing.

 

Everyone agrees that this is the way to do it, the question is how? How do you safely position yourself to make that 45-degree entry to the downwind leg at a non-towered airport, take the wind and terrain (airport advisories are not always available and you can only discern so much from a sectional) into account, and get a good look at an unfamiliar airport? Just use your heading indicator (HI), which some pilots call the directional gyro (DG), and think in three dimensions.To fly a specific heading, you turn the airplane until the desired heading is under the lubber line at the top of your heading indicator. You’ll align it to the magnetic compass before flight (and periodically during flight). When you enter the runway and prepare to take off, the heading indicator should match the magnetic alignment of the runway you’re using.

Most HIS also have tick marks every 45 degrees. They are used when intercepting VOR radials, for example. You can also use them to accurately fly 45 degrees away from the desired runway, and then to reverse your course to give a perfect pattern entry every time.

READ ON

Safety Seminar
SYSTEMS/INSTRUMENTS
Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 7:00 – 10:00 pm
CFI Deandre Robinson
Free – Bring a Friend.

Staff Additions & Changes:
Welcome to Raritan Valley Flying School, CFII Brian Moor, who is a part time instructor.And welcome Alexander Derkatsch as flight coordinator.  Please be patient while he learns our system.Also, welcome to Matt Paradowski as an additional lineman.

Congratulations, Chris Almonte

Effective immediately, Chris Almonte is now the supervisor ot our CATS Testing Center.  He has gone through all of the tedious screening to make sure he is compliant.  So if you have any questions regarding taking the test, contact Chris..

Summer Tours of 39N
During the months of July and August we offer free airport tours to the public.  Whether they are pre-schoolers or seniors, everyone will get a chance to enjoy the airport environment.  This is also a positive way for the public to understand why we need airports.
Date:  Every Tuesday (weather permitting)
Time:  10:30 am
Cost:  Free
So spread the word – every parent looks for things to do with children (of all ages).  We welcome them to Princeton Airport.
For more information, check www.princetonairport.com

FAA Medical DoctorDoctor Michael NoskoCall for next doctor’s visit.
IMPORTANT NEWS REGARDING MEDICAL APPLICATIONS!!

EFFECTIVE OCT 1 2012 (FOR NEXT FAA DOC APPOINTMENT):
ALL FAA MEDICAL FORMS MUST BE FILLED OUT ON-LINE @
PRIOR TO YOUR MEDICAL EXAMINATION.
You must bring the confirmation number with you when you come for your medical appointment.  No walk-in without a confirmation number.

PAFT logo

Princeton Airport Flying Tigers
The Tigers will fly to Newport, RI for the next fly-in on June 9th.

 

Our next dinner meeting will be held at the Pind Restaurantk Kingston on September 11th.

Please visit our website for details.

 

For more information

41 Airpark Rd, Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 921-3100


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